Archive for June, 2014

Strontia Springs Dam — under the spillway

Last week we explored the history of the High Line Canal, which begins at a diversion dam on the South Platte River 1.8 miles upstream from the mouth of Waterton Canyon. Roughly five more miles up the canyon is Strontia Springs Dam.

And, as we learned in our trip to Cheesman Reservoir two weeks ago, several Denver Water reservoirs filled this spring during the runoff, including Strontia Springs Reservoir.

Lance Cloyd, Denver Water’s Strontia Springs caretaker, provides an all-access tour of the area with behind-the-scenes vantage points capturing the beauty behind 800 cubic feet per second flowing out of the spillway.

 

Take a trip down the High Line Canal

The trail along the High Line Canal is a favorite urban getaway that meanders 66 miles across the Denver metro area. While the waterway (71-miles long) is owned and operated by Denver Water, this National Landmark Trail is maintained by municipal recreation agencies.

The workers who built the High Line Canal more than a century ago didn’t envision that people would be using their ambitious irrigation project as a recreational outlet in the midst of a busy urban area. Take a trip back in time with Greenwood Village to learn how the canal transformed into the recreational amenity it is today.

Beyond The Green – The High Line Canal Trail


The Guide to the High Line Canal Trail, a full-color guide with mile-by-mile descriptions and a pull-out trail map, is a perfect companion for anyone looking to enjoy a slice of the outdoors in the middle of a city.

The Guide is only available at local bookstores or their online sites, and select retail outlets (listed here). Prices vary by store ($10.95 – $11.99).

Don’t be “that guy”

Check out Denver Water's annual watering rules to avoid being this guy.

Check out Denver Water’s annual watering rules to avoid being this guy.

Denver Water customers have created a culture of conservation. In fact, water use is down by about 21 percent compared to our benchmark of pre-2002 use. This is a great accomplishment, especially when you consider there are 10 percent more customers in our service area.

Through our aggressive conservation programs and campaigns, customers recognize that conserving water is the right thing to do in our semi-arid region. But, there are other reasons why this culture of conservation has been adopted, from enjoying the beauty that water-wise plants add to the landscape to saving money by saving water.

We also know that many customers simply don’t want to be “that guy.” The one in the neighborhood who stands out because he hasn’t adopted the same conservation practices as everyone else. This concept inspired Denver Water’s 2014 Use Only What You Need campaign:

  • Don’t be that guy. The one watering between 10 a.m. and 6 p.m.
  • Don’t be that guy. The one watering when it’s raining.
  • Don’t be that guy. The one with sprinkler system spraying the street.

To visually highlight the campaign in a humorous way, Denver Water took inspiration from pop culture. By using pictures that many would consider to be a representation of “that guy,” the campaign portrays exaggerated characters — wasting water — on billboards and bus tails and shelters throughout the Denver metro area.

From the guy who hits the gym twice a day before baking in the tanning booth, to the one who wears skin-tight jeans, suspenders and a waxed handle-bar mustache, the characters are so over-the-top that they clash with their environment. Just like water wasters don’t fit into our community that embraces water conservation.

So, if you are sitting next to your significant other right now, in matching sweater vests, khakis and white Keds, you may in fact be “that guy.” However, there is hope, because you don’t have to be “that guy” when it comes to water conservation as long as you use only what you need.

For more images and to join in on the conversation, follow #DontBeThatGuyDenver on Twitter this summer.

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Reservoirs fill and spill

Several Denver Water reservoirs filled this spring during the runoff. Cheesman, Strontia Springs, Eleven Mile Canyon and Williams Fork all had water going over the spillways.

The high water allowed Denver Water to conduct the first full-capacity test of Cheesman Dam’s jet flow gate on June 10 and 11, 2014. The gate was installed in 2012 as part of a project to upgrade the dam. The dam’s valve system controls the amount of water flowing from the reservoir into the South Platte River. Water successfully passed through the gate at a rate of 937 cubic feet per second.

Check out the photos and video 7News captured from a helicopter during the test.

Watch this video about the test:

 

Cheesman Dam photos:

Photographer Tim O’Hara captures water going over the Cheesman Dam spillway in early June.

Photographer Tim O’Hara captures water going over the Cheesman Dam spillway in early June.

Jeff Martin, Denver Water engineering project manager, said the test was successful and the gate will provide better redundancy in dam operations.

Jeff Martin, Denver Water engineering project manager, said the test was successful and the gate will provide better redundancy in dam operations.

Water flows out of the Cheesman Dam auxiliary discharge at 937 cubic feet per second.

Water flows out of the Cheesman Dam auxiliary discharge at 937 cubic feet per second.

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