Pop quiz — perceptions of water use

By Lindsay Weber, Denver Water demand planner

promolabel_blue_lookPop quiz: Why is it important to know how much water different activities use — like flushing a toilet or taking a shower?

Answer: Because knowledge is power, and if you know how much water you are using, you can also figure out how much water you can save.

So, are you up for the challenge? Below are questions about common household indoor uses of water. If you don’t know the answers to these questions, or if you don’t think that they have a major impact on your daily water use, you’re not alone. A recent national study shows that Americans are likely to underestimate the amount of water used by various activities by a factor of two, and are likely to greatly underestimate activities that use a lot of water — such as filling a swimming pool.

Take the challenge:

 Answers:

1) B

In 2011, Denver Water conducted a residential water use study and found that the toilets in our service area have a median volume of 2.4 gallons of water per flush. To save water, you can flush less, but you can also use Denver Water’s rebate program to offset the purchase of a WaterSense-labeled toilet that uses as little as 1.28 or even 1.0 gallons per flush. This is especially important if you have an old, water-guzzling toilet from before 1996 that can use three or more gallons per flush.

In 2012, Denver Water conducted a residential end use study and found that the toilets in our service area have a median volume of 2.4 gallons of water per flush. To save water, you can flush less, but you also can use Denver Water’s rebate program to offset the purchase of a WaterSense-labeled toilet that uses as little as 1.28 or even 1.0 gallons per flush. This is especially important if you have an old, water-guzzling toilet from before 1996 that uses three or more gallons per flush.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2) B

Denver Water customers use about 16 gallons of water to take a shower. Obviously, shortening the time spent in the shower will save water, but efficient showerheads will also help. A WaterSense-labeled showerhead saves 20 percent more water than a conventional showerhead, and it will save energy too.

Denver Water customers use about 16 gallons of water to take a shower. Obviously, shortening the time spent in the shower will save water, but efficient showerheads also will help. A WaterSense-labeled showerhead saves 20 percent more water than a conventional showerhead, and it will save energy too.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3) B

Clothes washers in the Denver Water service area use an average of 30 gallons per load. Considering Denver Water households do about a load of laundry each day, that can add up over a year. To save water, you can reduce the number of loads you do, but you also can look into getting a more efficient clothes washer. An ENERGY STAR clothes washer uses only 15 gallons of water per load — and will save you money on your energy bill too.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Congratulations, you’ve completed the first step of figuring out how much water you are using. Now that you have the power, it’s time to figure out how much water you can save.

Further info:

Water wisely during Smart Irrigation Month

Smart_Irrigation_Month_logoThe hot month of July typically is when people use the most water. In honor of this busy lawn-watering month, the Irrigation Association created Smart Irrigation Month to remind people about the importance of appropriate irrigation technology and wise watering habits to reduce water use, create healthy lawns and achieve greater agricultural yields.

You can take part in Smart Irrigation Month with these simple tips:

Abide by the watering rules

To help eliminate outdoor water waste, Denver Water implements annual summer water use rules, which help facilitate smart irrigation. The rules include:

  • Water during cooler times of the day — lawn watering is NOT allowed between 10 a.m. and 6 p.m.
  • Water no more than three days per week.
  • Do not allow water to pool in gutters, streets and alleys.
  • Do not waste water by letting it spray on concrete or asphalt.
  • Repair leaking sprinkler systems within 10 days.
  • Do not irrigate while it is raining or during high winds.
  • Use a hose nozzle with a shut-off valve when washing your car.

Chart your water consumption and get conservation tips — all online

Everything you need to save water, pay your bill and learn about Denver Water is at your fingertips. Denver Water has several ways for customers to stay connected online:

  • Chart your monthly water consumption.
  • Follow us on Twitter and Instagram for instant updates and conservation tips.
  • Subscribe to this blog for regular tips, updates and guest posts about conservation (on the right-hand side of this page).
  • Sign up to receive E-Tap or CNSRV, e-newsletters with news related to Denver Water and monthly conservation tips.
Alicia Geary, Water Saver, helps a customer program their smart controller. Denver Water has a team of nine Water Savers out in the community to provide customers with tips and tools for water-saving practices this summer.

Valerie Beyer, Water Saver, helps a customer program their smart controller. Denver Water has a team of nine Water Savers out in the community this summer.

Don’t lose water — and money — while on vacation

Going out of town for vacation? Make sure someone is keeping an eye on your irrigation system. Summer power failures can reset your sprinklers and cost you money!

It’s also important to replace your irrigation system’s backup battery each year so your sprinklers won’t go haywire in a power failure.

And install a smart irrigation controller with a rain sensor to prevent your system from running in the rain. Earn a rebate for WaterSense certified controllers.

Maintain a green lawn with less water 

A simple way to use less water while maintaining a green lawn is to use the cycle-and-soak method. Instead of setting your sprinklers for one 14-minute period, for example, set your irrigation system to run for seven minutes, rest for several minutes, then run for the remaining seven minutes to achieve the total 14-minute run-time. Doing so will reduce wasteful runoff.

Peruse through past blog posts

Explore Denver Water’s 2014 Water Quality Report

We live in one of the healthiest states in the U.S. Last year, in fact, Colorado was ranked the eighth healthiest state in the nation by United Health Foundation.

While being healthy means different things for different people, most would agree that knowing what you put into your body is a place to start. If you have the time, you can read food labels to see what’s in your food, but what about when you turn on the tap? Ever wonder what’s in your water?

For Denver Water employees, our mission is to make sure customers receive clean, safe, great-tasting water every day. Last year we collected more than 16,000 samples and conducted more than 60,000 tests to ensure just that.

We’re lucky here in the Mile High City — Denver’s drinking water is 100 percent surface water that comes from rivers, lakes, streams, reservoirs and springs fed by high-quality mountain snow runoff. We vigilantly safeguard our mountain water supplies, and we carefully treat the water before it reaches your tap.

Part of our mission is letting you know where your water comes from and what’s in it by releasing our annual Water Quality Report. We are pleased to report exhaustive testing in accordance with U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment guidelines has shown that our drinking water is safe and meets and exceeds all federal and state requirements.

Denver Water’s 2014 Water Quality Report talks about the water system, the treatment process, and what is and is not in your water. Above, the table “Regulated Water Contaminants: What is in the water?” (from page 7 of the report) shows the results of water quality tests over the last year. See page 4 for a glossary of terms.

Denver Water’s 2014 Water Quality Report talks about the water system, the treatment process, and what is and is not in your water. Above, the table “Regulated Water Contaminants: What is in the water?” (from page 7 of the report) shows the results of water quality tests over the last year. See page 4 for a glossary of terms.

Video collage — Beautiful, water-efficient landscapes of our customers

Because July is Smart Irrigation Month, we thought it would be fun to highlight some of our customers who have transformed their yards into a more water-efficient landscape.

We sent out Denver Water’s team of nine Water Savers, who spend their day with customers providing water-saving tips and tools, to capture some of the beautiful landscapes throughout Denver Water’s service area. In just one day, our Water Savers captured more than 100 photos highlighting a variety of efficient landscapes.

This video highlights a portion of what the Water Savers discovered.

 

Transforming your landscape doesn’t have to be extreme or even happen all at once. It can be as simple as identifying an area of your grass that is difficult to maintain because it is on a slope or receives too much sun exposure, or by locating areas of turf that aren’t necessary or beneficial, like on the side of your house or the sidewalk strip. By upgrading these unused or difficult-to-maintain areas, you’ll create a more efficient landscape — without sacrificing beneficial areas of your grass for kids and pets to play.

For landscape improvement ideas, check out our Transforming Landscape series:

 

Strontia Springs Dam — under the spillway

Last week we explored the history of the High Line Canal, which begins at a diversion dam on the South Platte River 1.8 miles upstream from the mouth of Waterton Canyon. Roughly five more miles up the canyon is Strontia Springs Dam.

And, as we learned in our trip to Cheesman Reservoir two weeks ago, several Denver Water reservoirs filled this spring during the runoff, including Strontia Springs Reservoir.

Lance Cloyd, Denver Water’s Strontia Springs caretaker, provides an all-access tour of the area with behind-the-scenes vantage points capturing the beauty behind 800 cubic feet per second flowing out of the spillway.

 

Take a trip down the High Line Canal

The trail along the High Line Canal is a favorite urban getaway that meanders 66 miles across the Denver metro area. While the waterway (71-miles long) is owned and operated by Denver Water, this National Landmark Trail is maintained by municipal recreation agencies.

The workers who built the High Line Canal more than a century ago didn’t envision that people would be using their ambitious irrigation project as a recreational outlet in the midst of a busy urban area. Take a trip back in time with Greenwood Village to learn how the canal transformed into the recreational amenity it is today.

Beyond The Green – The High Line Canal Trail


The Guide to the High Line Canal Trail, a full-color guide with mile-by-mile descriptions and a pull-out trail map, is a perfect companion for anyone looking to enjoy a slice of the outdoors in the middle of a city.

The Guide is only available at local bookstores or their online sites, and select retail outlets (listed here). Prices vary by store ($10.95 – $11.99).

Don’t be “that guy”

Check out Denver Water's annual watering rules to avoid being this guy.

Check out Denver Water’s annual watering rules to avoid being this guy.

Denver Water customers have created a culture of conservation. In fact, water use is down by about 21 percent compared to our benchmark of pre-2002 use. This is a great accomplishment, especially when you consider there are 10 percent more customers in our service area.

Through our aggressive conservation programs and campaigns, customers recognize that conserving water is the right thing to do in our semi-arid region. But, there are other reasons why this culture of conservation has been adopted, from enjoying the beauty that water-wise plants add to the landscape to saving money by saving water.

We also know that many customers simply don’t want to be “that guy.” The one in the neighborhood who stands out because he hasn’t adopted the same conservation practices as everyone else. This concept inspired Denver Water’s 2014 Use Only What You Need campaign:

  • Don’t be that guy. The one watering between 10 a.m. and 6 p.m.
  • Don’t be that guy. The one watering when it’s raining.
  • Don’t be that guy. The one with sprinkler system spraying the street.

To visually highlight the campaign in a humorous way, Denver Water took inspiration from pop culture. By using pictures that many would consider to be a representation of “that guy,” the campaign portrays exaggerated characters — wasting water — on billboards and bus tails and shelters throughout the Denver metro area.

From the guy who hits the gym twice a day before baking in the tanning booth, to the one who wears skin-tight jeans, suspenders and a waxed handle-bar mustache, the characters are so over-the-top that they clash with their environment. Just like water wasters don’t fit into our community that embraces water conservation.

So, if you are sitting next to your significant other right now, in matching sweater vests, khakis and white Keds, you may in fact be “that guy.” However, there is hope, because you don’t have to be “that guy” when it comes to water conservation as long as you use only what you need.

For more images and to join in on the conversation, follow #DontBeThatGuyDenver on Twitter this summer.

DW-0551-Uber-80x30-Wlscp

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 112 other followers

%d bloggers like this: